A follow-along study of postsecondary outcomes for graduates and dropouts with mild disabilities in a rural setting.

M. J. Karpinski, D. A. Neubert, S. Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Eighty-six students with mild disabilities living in a rural area who had graduated (n = 52) or dropped out of (n = 34) high school were interviewed at two points in time (7 months apart) about their employment, residential status, and participation in postsecondary education and training programs. Information was also collected on students' high school experiences (educational, vocational, and work) and the reasons they dropped out of school. Of the students who had graduated (Caucasian = 26, black = 25, and other = 1), 31 were male and 21 were female. Of the students who had dropped out (Caucasian = 18, black = 15, and other = 1), 22 were male and 12 female. It was found that the majority of graduates and dropouts were employed full-time at both interviews, and held jobs that paid above minimum wage and provided employee benefits, as well. Nevertheless, by the time of the terminal interview, graduates had worked proportionally more time since high school than dropouts and had been employed in their current job more than twice as long. Neither group of former special education students was particularly active in pursuing postsecondary education or training programs. Finally, these former students had participated in a limited range of educational and vocational experiences during high school, both in terms of diploma tracks and vocational education programs. The implications of the findings for long-term employment and community adjustment are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-385
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of learning disabilities
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

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