A focus on implementation of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in high schools

Associations with bullying and other indicators of school disorder

Catherine P. Bradshaw, Elise T. Pas, Katrina J. Debnam, Sarah Lindstrom Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is growing interest in the use of a multitiered system of supports framework to address issues related to school climate and bullying. Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is one such model that has received considerable attention; however, nearly all of the extant literature has focused on elementary and middle schools, with limited research on high schools. Furthermore, research on PBIS implementation in high schools, particularly in relation to school context, is scant. The current article examined the adoption and implementation of PBIS in 31 high schools randomly assigned to implement PBIS, within the context of a larger 58 high school randomized trial. We first present descriptive data on the rollout of the core features of PBIS, as measured by a set of research-based implementation tools administered by outside observers. We then explore the extent to which baseline rates of bullying and other school-level indicators of disorder were associated with the adoption of the multitiered PBIS framework over the course of 2 years. Multilevel analyses on the longitudinal implementation data indicated that schools with higher baseline rates of bullying generally implemented PBIS with greater fidelity over time. This suggests that schools with increased bullying may be particularly motivated to adopt PBIS. However, other baseline indicators of disorder were generally not associated with PBIS implementation and thus do not appear to be barriers to adoption. Implications for implementation research and practice in high schools are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-498
Number of pages19
Journal School Psychology Review
Volume44
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Bullying
exclusion
school
Research
research implementation
school climate
Multilevel Analysis
elementary school
Climate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

A focus on implementation of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in high schools : Associations with bullying and other indicators of school disorder. / Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Pas, Elise T.; Debnam, Katrina J.; Lindstrom Johnson, Sarah.

In: School Psychology Review, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.12.2015, p. 480-498.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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