A feedback systems approach to modeling neural firing-rate homeostasis

Niranjan Chakravarthy, Shivkumar Sabesan, Andreas Spanias, Leon Iasemidis, Konstantinos Tsakalis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We consider a cortical neural population model in an effort to understand the basic mechanisms that regulate and maintain "normal" neural firing-rate despite changes in the cortical input level. Towards this goal, we have postulated the existence of internal feedback structures that functionally model firing-rate homeostasis via the balance of excitation and inhibition. In particular, normal internal feedback action maintains normal firing-rate by regulating the strength of excitatory input from pyramidal neurons in other cortical populations, and the strength of inhibitory input from interneurons. We observe that a pathology in the internal feedback that regulates the inhibitory input can lead to seizure-like high amplitude oscillations. These arise from two mechanisms, namely, excessive specific recurrent excitation between cortical populations, and excessive non-specific excitatory input. Further, we develop an external closed-loop control technique where the controller acts to achieve the operational objective of maintaining normal firing-rate. In addition to that, the external controller is also successful in avoiding the occurrence of "seizures". The results of this analysis are consistent with recent experimental observations in the epileptic brain, and have an interesting physical interpretation and implications for the treatment of disorders such as epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control
Pages602-608
Number of pages7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event46th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control 2007, CDC - New Orleans, LA, United States
Duration: Dec 12 2007Dec 14 2007

Other

Other46th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control 2007, CDC
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans, LA
Period12/12/0712/14/07

Fingerprint

Feedback
Controllers
Pathology
Neurons
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Chemical Health and Safety

Cite this

Chakravarthy, N., Sabesan, S., Spanias, A., Iasemidis, L., & Tsakalis, K. (2007). A feedback systems approach to modeling neural firing-rate homeostasis. In Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (pp. 602-608). [4434892] https://doi.org/10.1109/CDC.2007.4434892

A feedback systems approach to modeling neural firing-rate homeostasis. / Chakravarthy, Niranjan; Sabesan, Shivkumar; Spanias, Andreas; Iasemidis, Leon; Tsakalis, Konstantinos.

Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control. 2007. p. 602-608 4434892.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chakravarthy, N, Sabesan, S, Spanias, A, Iasemidis, L & Tsakalis, K 2007, A feedback systems approach to modeling neural firing-rate homeostasis. in Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control., 4434892, pp. 602-608, 46th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control 2007, CDC, New Orleans, LA, United States, 12/12/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/CDC.2007.4434892
Chakravarthy N, Sabesan S, Spanias A, Iasemidis L, Tsakalis K. A feedback systems approach to modeling neural firing-rate homeostasis. In Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control. 2007. p. 602-608. 4434892 https://doi.org/10.1109/CDC.2007.4434892
Chakravarthy, Niranjan ; Sabesan, Shivkumar ; Spanias, Andreas ; Iasemidis, Leon ; Tsakalis, Konstantinos. / A feedback systems approach to modeling neural firing-rate homeostasis. Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control. 2007. pp. 602-608
@inproceedings{e013e5347a76491fb4b36b6eee356cf3,
title = "A feedback systems approach to modeling neural firing-rate homeostasis",
abstract = "We consider a cortical neural population model in an effort to understand the basic mechanisms that regulate and maintain {"}normal{"} neural firing-rate despite changes in the cortical input level. Towards this goal, we have postulated the existence of internal feedback structures that functionally model firing-rate homeostasis via the balance of excitation and inhibition. In particular, normal internal feedback action maintains normal firing-rate by regulating the strength of excitatory input from pyramidal neurons in other cortical populations, and the strength of inhibitory input from interneurons. We observe that a pathology in the internal feedback that regulates the inhibitory input can lead to seizure-like high amplitude oscillations. These arise from two mechanisms, namely, excessive specific recurrent excitation between cortical populations, and excessive non-specific excitatory input. Further, we develop an external closed-loop control technique where the controller acts to achieve the operational objective of maintaining normal firing-rate. In addition to that, the external controller is also successful in avoiding the occurrence of {"}seizures{"}. The results of this analysis are consistent with recent experimental observations in the epileptic brain, and have an interesting physical interpretation and implications for the treatment of disorders such as epilepsy.",
author = "Niranjan Chakravarthy and Shivkumar Sabesan and Andreas Spanias and Leon Iasemidis and Konstantinos Tsakalis",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1109/CDC.2007.4434892",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "1424414989",
pages = "602--608",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - A feedback systems approach to modeling neural firing-rate homeostasis

AU - Chakravarthy, Niranjan

AU - Sabesan, Shivkumar

AU - Spanias, Andreas

AU - Iasemidis, Leon

AU - Tsakalis, Konstantinos

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - We consider a cortical neural population model in an effort to understand the basic mechanisms that regulate and maintain "normal" neural firing-rate despite changes in the cortical input level. Towards this goal, we have postulated the existence of internal feedback structures that functionally model firing-rate homeostasis via the balance of excitation and inhibition. In particular, normal internal feedback action maintains normal firing-rate by regulating the strength of excitatory input from pyramidal neurons in other cortical populations, and the strength of inhibitory input from interneurons. We observe that a pathology in the internal feedback that regulates the inhibitory input can lead to seizure-like high amplitude oscillations. These arise from two mechanisms, namely, excessive specific recurrent excitation between cortical populations, and excessive non-specific excitatory input. Further, we develop an external closed-loop control technique where the controller acts to achieve the operational objective of maintaining normal firing-rate. In addition to that, the external controller is also successful in avoiding the occurrence of "seizures". The results of this analysis are consistent with recent experimental observations in the epileptic brain, and have an interesting physical interpretation and implications for the treatment of disorders such as epilepsy.

AB - We consider a cortical neural population model in an effort to understand the basic mechanisms that regulate and maintain "normal" neural firing-rate despite changes in the cortical input level. Towards this goal, we have postulated the existence of internal feedback structures that functionally model firing-rate homeostasis via the balance of excitation and inhibition. In particular, normal internal feedback action maintains normal firing-rate by regulating the strength of excitatory input from pyramidal neurons in other cortical populations, and the strength of inhibitory input from interneurons. We observe that a pathology in the internal feedback that regulates the inhibitory input can lead to seizure-like high amplitude oscillations. These arise from two mechanisms, namely, excessive specific recurrent excitation between cortical populations, and excessive non-specific excitatory input. Further, we develop an external closed-loop control technique where the controller acts to achieve the operational objective of maintaining normal firing-rate. In addition to that, the external controller is also successful in avoiding the occurrence of "seizures". The results of this analysis are consistent with recent experimental observations in the epileptic brain, and have an interesting physical interpretation and implications for the treatment of disorders such as epilepsy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=62749103445&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=62749103445&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/CDC.2007.4434892

DO - 10.1109/CDC.2007.4434892

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 1424414989

SN - 9781424414987

SP - 602

EP - 608

BT - Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control

ER -