A Factorial Model of Aggregate Spatio‐Temporal Behavior: Application to the Diurnal Cycle

Michael Goodchild, Brian Klinkenberg, Donald G. Janelle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cross‐sectional nature of much social data, coupled with the static view provided by maps and current spatial data handling software, have produced a tradition of research on urban spatial structure that is largely two‐dimensional and derived from residential locations. The paper presents an analysis of a space‐time diary data set collected in Halifax, Nova Scotia. A series of transformations are used to convert the individual diary records to a three‐mode matrix of intensities, which is then analyzed using the PARAFAC three‐mode factor model. Home/work is found to be the strongest organizing dimension of the urban space‐time, followed by entertainment, shopping, and education / work. We show how these dimensions appear to varying degrees in different locations, time periods, and human activities. The paper argues for a dynamic view of urban spatial structure in which only the physical facilities remain static. 1993 The Ohio State University

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-294
Number of pages18
JournalGeographical Analysis
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

residential location
spatial data
human activity
education
social data
software
matrix
entertainment
analysis
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

A Factorial Model of Aggregate Spatio‐Temporal Behavior : Application to the Diurnal Cycle. / Goodchild, Michael; Klinkenberg, Brian; Janelle, Donald G.

In: Geographical Analysis, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.01.1993, p. 277-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goodchild, Michael ; Klinkenberg, Brian ; Janelle, Donald G. / A Factorial Model of Aggregate Spatio‐Temporal Behavior : Application to the Diurnal Cycle. In: Geographical Analysis. 1993 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 277-294.
@article{2a1a17acbe3f4b0786ad011dc143603d,
title = "A Factorial Model of Aggregate Spatio‐Temporal Behavior: Application to the Diurnal Cycle",
abstract = "The cross‐sectional nature of much social data, coupled with the static view provided by maps and current spatial data handling software, have produced a tradition of research on urban spatial structure that is largely two‐dimensional and derived from residential locations. The paper presents an analysis of a space‐time diary data set collected in Halifax, Nova Scotia. A series of transformations are used to convert the individual diary records to a three‐mode matrix of intensities, which is then analyzed using the PARAFAC three‐mode factor model. Home/work is found to be the strongest organizing dimension of the urban space‐time, followed by entertainment, shopping, and education / work. We show how these dimensions appear to varying degrees in different locations, time periods, and human activities. The paper argues for a dynamic view of urban spatial structure in which only the physical facilities remain static. 1993 The Ohio State University",
author = "Michael Goodchild and Brian Klinkenberg and Janelle, {Donald G.}",
year = "1993",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1538-4632.1993.tb00299.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "277--294",
journal = "Geographical Analysis",
issn = "0016-7363",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Factorial Model of Aggregate Spatio‐Temporal Behavior

T2 - Application to the Diurnal Cycle

AU - Goodchild, Michael

AU - Klinkenberg, Brian

AU - Janelle, Donald G.

PY - 1993/1/1

Y1 - 1993/1/1

N2 - The cross‐sectional nature of much social data, coupled with the static view provided by maps and current spatial data handling software, have produced a tradition of research on urban spatial structure that is largely two‐dimensional and derived from residential locations. The paper presents an analysis of a space‐time diary data set collected in Halifax, Nova Scotia. A series of transformations are used to convert the individual diary records to a three‐mode matrix of intensities, which is then analyzed using the PARAFAC three‐mode factor model. Home/work is found to be the strongest organizing dimension of the urban space‐time, followed by entertainment, shopping, and education / work. We show how these dimensions appear to varying degrees in different locations, time periods, and human activities. The paper argues for a dynamic view of urban spatial structure in which only the physical facilities remain static. 1993 The Ohio State University

AB - The cross‐sectional nature of much social data, coupled with the static view provided by maps and current spatial data handling software, have produced a tradition of research on urban spatial structure that is largely two‐dimensional and derived from residential locations. The paper presents an analysis of a space‐time diary data set collected in Halifax, Nova Scotia. A series of transformations are used to convert the individual diary records to a three‐mode matrix of intensities, which is then analyzed using the PARAFAC three‐mode factor model. Home/work is found to be the strongest organizing dimension of the urban space‐time, followed by entertainment, shopping, and education / work. We show how these dimensions appear to varying degrees in different locations, time periods, and human activities. The paper argues for a dynamic view of urban spatial structure in which only the physical facilities remain static. 1993 The Ohio State University

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027739010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027739010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1538-4632.1993.tb00299.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1538-4632.1993.tb00299.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0027739010

VL - 25

SP - 277

EP - 294

JO - Geographical Analysis

JF - Geographical Analysis

SN - 0016-7363

IS - 4

ER -