A cytokine immunosensor for Multiple Sclerosis detection based upon label-free electrochemical impedance spectroscopy using electroplated printed circuit board electrodes

Kinjal Bhavsar, Aaron Fairchild, Eric Alonas, Daniel K. Bishop, Jeffrey LaBelle, James Sweeney, Terry Alford, Lokesh Joshi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

A biosensor for the serum cytokine, Interleukin-12 (IL-12), based upon a label-free electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) monitoring approach is described. Overexpression of IL-12 has been correlated to the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). An immunosensor has been fabricated by electroplating gold onto a disposable printed circuit board (PCB) electrode and immobilizing anti-IL-12 monoclonal antibodies (MAb) onto the surface of the electrode. This approach yields a robust sensor that facilitates reproducible mass fabrication and easy alteration of the electrode shape. Results indicate that this novel PCB sensor can detect IL-12 at physiological levels, <100 fM with f-values of 0.05 (typically <0.0001) in a label-free and rapid manner. A linear (with respect to log concentration) detectable range was achieved. Detection in a complex biological solution is also explored; however, significant loss of dynamic range is noted in the 100% complex solution. The cost effective approach described here can be used potentially for diagnosis of diseases (like MS) with known biomarkers in body fluids and for monitoring physiological levels of biomolecules with healthcare, food, and environmental relevance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)506-509
Number of pages4
JournalBiosensors and Bioelectronics
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2009

Keywords

  • Cytokine
  • Electrodeposition
  • Impedance
  • Label-free

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biophysics
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Electrochemistry

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