A CRITIQUE OF BOROWITZ'S POSTMODERN JEWISH THEOLOGY

Norbert M. Samuelson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract. Borowitz's book is primarily a systematic response by a liberal Jewish theologian to his perceived challenges from rationalism on one hand and postmodernism on the other. It is within this context that Borowitz discusses issues of the relationship between modern science and Judaism. The first part of this essay is a summary of Borowitz's book. Here I locate Borowitz's place in the general discipline of Jewish philosophy and theology. The second part of the paper is a critique of Borowitz's discussion of postmodernism and liberalism. It is in this concluding section that the issues raised by contemporary science for Jewish religious thought are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-282
Number of pages16
JournalZygon
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Keywords

  • asymptote
  • atomism and relationalism
  • autonomy
  • Bertrand Russell and the Principia Mathematica
  • calculus
  • covenantal theology
  • entities, parts, and collections
  • Eugene B. Borowitz
  • hafakhah and aggadah
  • Hermann Cohen
  • hopeless hope
  • human rights and democracy
  • individual rights
  • Jewish and singular self
  • liberalism and traditionalism
  • Martin Buber
  • modernism and postmodernism
  • moral relativism
  • Newtonian physics
  • quantum mechanics
  • rationalism and nonrationalism
  • realism
  • Reconstructionist, Conservative, and Orthodox Judaism
  • Steven Schwarz‐schild
  • universalism and particularism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Education
  • Cultural Studies

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