A College Entrance Essay Exam Intervention for Students With High-Incidence Disabilities and Struggling Writers

Amber B. Ray, Steve Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

High school students with high-incidence disabilities and struggling writers face considerable challenges when taking writing assessments designed for college entrance. This study examined the effectiveness of a writing intervention for improving students’ performance on a college entrance exam, the writing assessment for the ACT. Students were taught a planning and composing strategy for successfully taking this test using the self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) model. A true-experiment was conducted where 20 high school students were randomly assigned to a treatment (N = 10) or control (N = 10) condition. Control students received ACT math preparation. SRSD instruction statistically enhanced students’ planning, the quality of their written text (including ideas and analysis, development and support, organization, and language use), the inclusion of argumentative elements in their compositions, and the use of transition words in written text. Limitations of the study, future research, and implications for practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLearning Disability Quarterly
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • high school
  • high-incidence disabilities
  • high-stakes testing
  • writing intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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