A choice-based method to compare alternative alcohol warning labels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alternative alcohol warning labels were studied with a method used in magical-thinking research. In two studies (N = 111, N = 75), subjects completed a questionnaire. A 'poison,' 'toxic' or 'causes cancer' label on a beer can was shown to have substantial effects on self-reported choice behavior. In contrast, the alcohol warning label now mandated to appear on alcohol containers did not have nearly as powerful an effect. Explanations for the lack of strong effects of the mandated warning label center around label length, type of warning and salience of the warning. The methodology described in this article appears to test gut-level or conditioned responses to labels, which may be a valuable technique for evaluating warning labels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)614-617
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol
Volume54
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1993

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Labels
Poisons
alcohol
Alcohols
Choice Behavior
cancer
cause
questionnaire
lack
Beer
methodology
Research
Neoplasms
Containers
Thinking
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

A choice-based method to compare alternative alcohol warning labels. / Mackinnon, David.

In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Vol. 54, No. 5, 1993, p. 614-617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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