A characterization of the error exponent for the Byzantine CEO Problem

Oliver Kosut, Lang Tong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The discrete CEO Problem is considered when the agents are under Byzantine attack. That is, a malicious intruder has captured an unknown subset of the agents and reprogrammed them to increase the probability of error. Two traitor models are considered, depending on whether the traitors are able to see honest agents' messages before choosing their own. If they can, bounds are given on the error exponent with respect to the sum-rate as a function of the fraction of agents that are traitors. The number of traitors is assumed to be known to the CEO, but not their identity. If they are not able to see the honest agents' messages, an exact but uncomputable characterization of the error exponent is given. It is shown that for a given sum-rate, the minimum achievable probability of error is within a factor of two of a quantity based on the traitors simulating a false distribution to generate messages they send to the CEO. This false distribution is chosen by the traitors to increase the probability of error as much as possible without revealing their identities to the CEO. Because this quantity is always within a constant factor of the probability of error, it gives the error exponent directly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication46th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing
Pages1207-1214
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event46th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing - Monticello, IL, United States
Duration: Sep 24 2008Sep 26 2008

Other

Other46th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing
CountryUnited States
CityMonticello, IL
Period9/24/089/26/08

Keywords

  • Byzantine attack
  • Distributed source coding
  • Network security
  • Sensor fusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Software
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Communication

Cite this

Kosut, O., & Tong, L. (2008). A characterization of the error exponent for the Byzantine CEO Problem. In 46th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing (pp. 1207-1214). [4797697] https://doi.org/10.1109/ALLERTON.2008.4797697

A characterization of the error exponent for the Byzantine CEO Problem. / Kosut, Oliver; Tong, Lang.

46th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing. 2008. p. 1207-1214 4797697.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kosut, O & Tong, L 2008, A characterization of the error exponent for the Byzantine CEO Problem. in 46th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing., 4797697, pp. 1207-1214, 46th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing, Monticello, IL, United States, 9/24/08. https://doi.org/10.1109/ALLERTON.2008.4797697
Kosut O, Tong L. A characterization of the error exponent for the Byzantine CEO Problem. In 46th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing. 2008. p. 1207-1214. 4797697 https://doi.org/10.1109/ALLERTON.2008.4797697
Kosut, Oliver ; Tong, Lang. / A characterization of the error exponent for the Byzantine CEO Problem. 46th Annual Allerton Conference on Communication, Control, and Computing. 2008. pp. 1207-1214
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