A Brief Measure of Language Skills at 3 Years of Age and Special Education Use in Middle Childhood

Laura Lee McIntyre, William E. Pelham, Matthew H. Kim, Thomas J. Dishion, Daniel S. Shaw, Melvin N. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To test whether a language screener administered during early childhood predicts special education referrals and placement in middle childhood. Study design A series of logistic regressions was conducted in a longitudinal study of 731 children. Predictor variables included scores on the early language screener (Fluharty Preschool Speech and Language Screening Test-Second Edition [Fluharty-2]) at ages 3 and 4 years, a standardized measure of academic achievement at age 5 years, and parent report of special education services at ages 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5 years. Results Results showed that higher scores on the Fluharty-2 predicted a reduced likelihood of having an individualized education program (OR 0.48), being referred for special education (OR 0.55), and being held back a grade (OR 0.37). These findings did not vary by sex, race, or ethnicity, and remained significant after controlling for male sex, behavior problems, parental education, and family income. The Fluharty-2 remained predictive of special education outcomes even after controlling for children's academic skills at age 5 years. Conclusions Results suggest that structured, brief assessments of language in early childhood are robust predictors of children's future engagement in special education services and low academic achievement. Primary care physicians may use a multipronged developmental surveillance and monitoring protocol designed to identify children who may need comprehensive evaluation and intervention. Early intervention may reduce the need for costly special education services in the future and reduce comorbid conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-194
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume181
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Special Education
Language
Language Tests
Education
Primary Care Physicians
Sexual Behavior
Longitudinal Studies
Referral and Consultation
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • communication skills
  • developmental screening
  • disabilities
  • early childhood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

McIntyre, L. L., Pelham, W. E., Kim, M. H., Dishion, T. J., Shaw, D. S., & Wilson, M. N. (2017). A Brief Measure of Language Skills at 3 Years of Age and Special Education Use in Middle Childhood. Journal of Pediatrics, 181, 189-194. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.10.035

A Brief Measure of Language Skills at 3 Years of Age and Special Education Use in Middle Childhood. / McIntyre, Laura Lee; Pelham, William E.; Kim, Matthew H.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Wilson, Melvin N.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 181, 01.02.2017, p. 189-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McIntyre, Laura Lee ; Pelham, William E. ; Kim, Matthew H. ; Dishion, Thomas J. ; Shaw, Daniel S. ; Wilson, Melvin N. / A Brief Measure of Language Skills at 3 Years of Age and Special Education Use in Middle Childhood. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 181. pp. 189-194.
@article{8014e18d5f384ce8ae503c619c416a27,
title = "A Brief Measure of Language Skills at 3 Years of Age and Special Education Use in Middle Childhood",
abstract = "Objective To test whether a language screener administered during early childhood predicts special education referrals and placement in middle childhood. Study design A series of logistic regressions was conducted in a longitudinal study of 731 children. Predictor variables included scores on the early language screener (Fluharty Preschool Speech and Language Screening Test-Second Edition [Fluharty-2]) at ages 3 and 4 years, a standardized measure of academic achievement at age 5 years, and parent report of special education services at ages 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5 years. Results Results showed that higher scores on the Fluharty-2 predicted a reduced likelihood of having an individualized education program (OR 0.48), being referred for special education (OR 0.55), and being held back a grade (OR 0.37). These findings did not vary by sex, race, or ethnicity, and remained significant after controlling for male sex, behavior problems, parental education, and family income. The Fluharty-2 remained predictive of special education outcomes even after controlling for children's academic skills at age 5 years. Conclusions Results suggest that structured, brief assessments of language in early childhood are robust predictors of children's future engagement in special education services and low academic achievement. Primary care physicians may use a multipronged developmental surveillance and monitoring protocol designed to identify children who may need comprehensive evaluation and intervention. Early intervention may reduce the need for costly special education services in the future and reduce comorbid conditions.",
keywords = "communication skills, developmental screening, disabilities, early childhood",
author = "McIntyre, {Laura Lee} and Pelham, {William E.} and Kim, {Matthew H.} and Dishion, {Thomas J.} and Shaw, {Daniel S.} and Wilson, {Melvin N.}",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.10.035",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "181",
pages = "189--194",
journal = "Journal of Pediatrics",
issn = "0022-3476",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Brief Measure of Language Skills at 3 Years of Age and Special Education Use in Middle Childhood

AU - McIntyre, Laura Lee

AU - Pelham, William E.

AU - Kim, Matthew H.

AU - Dishion, Thomas J.

AU - Shaw, Daniel S.

AU - Wilson, Melvin N.

PY - 2017/2/1

Y1 - 2017/2/1

N2 - Objective To test whether a language screener administered during early childhood predicts special education referrals and placement in middle childhood. Study design A series of logistic regressions was conducted in a longitudinal study of 731 children. Predictor variables included scores on the early language screener (Fluharty Preschool Speech and Language Screening Test-Second Edition [Fluharty-2]) at ages 3 and 4 years, a standardized measure of academic achievement at age 5 years, and parent report of special education services at ages 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5 years. Results Results showed that higher scores on the Fluharty-2 predicted a reduced likelihood of having an individualized education program (OR 0.48), being referred for special education (OR 0.55), and being held back a grade (OR 0.37). These findings did not vary by sex, race, or ethnicity, and remained significant after controlling for male sex, behavior problems, parental education, and family income. The Fluharty-2 remained predictive of special education outcomes even after controlling for children's academic skills at age 5 years. Conclusions Results suggest that structured, brief assessments of language in early childhood are robust predictors of children's future engagement in special education services and low academic achievement. Primary care physicians may use a multipronged developmental surveillance and monitoring protocol designed to identify children who may need comprehensive evaluation and intervention. Early intervention may reduce the need for costly special education services in the future and reduce comorbid conditions.

AB - Objective To test whether a language screener administered during early childhood predicts special education referrals and placement in middle childhood. Study design A series of logistic regressions was conducted in a longitudinal study of 731 children. Predictor variables included scores on the early language screener (Fluharty Preschool Speech and Language Screening Test-Second Edition [Fluharty-2]) at ages 3 and 4 years, a standardized measure of academic achievement at age 5 years, and parent report of special education services at ages 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5 years. Results Results showed that higher scores on the Fluharty-2 predicted a reduced likelihood of having an individualized education program (OR 0.48), being referred for special education (OR 0.55), and being held back a grade (OR 0.37). These findings did not vary by sex, race, or ethnicity, and remained significant after controlling for male sex, behavior problems, parental education, and family income. The Fluharty-2 remained predictive of special education outcomes even after controlling for children's academic skills at age 5 years. Conclusions Results suggest that structured, brief assessments of language in early childhood are robust predictors of children's future engagement in special education services and low academic achievement. Primary care physicians may use a multipronged developmental surveillance and monitoring protocol designed to identify children who may need comprehensive evaluation and intervention. Early intervention may reduce the need for costly special education services in the future and reduce comorbid conditions.

KW - communication skills

KW - developmental screening

KW - disabilities

KW - early childhood

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85007341302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85007341302&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.10.035

DO - 10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.10.035

M3 - Article

C2 - 27908645

AN - SCOPUS:85007341302

VL - 181

SP - 189

EP - 194

JO - Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0022-3476

ER -