Abstract

Women with breast cancer often experience weight gain during and after treatment, significantly increasing risk for recurrence as well as all-cause mortality. Based on a growing body of evidence, meditative movement practices may be effective for weight management. First, we describe the effects of stress on factors associated with weight gain for breast cancer survivors. Then, a model is proposed that utilizes existing evidence to suggest how meditative movement supports behavioral, psychological, and neurohormonal changes that may explain weight loss. Application of the model suggests how a novel “mindful-body-wisdom” approach may work to help reduce weight for this at-risk group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Psychology Open
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Weight Gain
Survivors
Weight Loss
Breast Neoplasms
Weights and Measures
Psychology
Recurrence
Mortality
Biobehavioral Sciences
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Eating behavior
  • Exercise
  • Model
  • Obesity
  • Psychological disturbance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A biobehavioral model of weight loss associated with meditative movement practice among breast cancer survivors. / Larkey, Linda; Vega-Lopez, Sonia; Keller, Colleen; McClain, Darya; Ainsworth, Barbara; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Smith, Lisa; Jeong, Mihyun.

In: Health Psychology Open, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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