3D Cortical electrophysiology of ballistic upper limb movement in humans

Edward Ofori, Stephen A. Coombes, David E. Vaillancourt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Precise motor control requires the ability to scale the parameters of movement. Theta oscillations across the cortex have been associated with changes in memory, attention, and sensorimotor processing. What has proven more elusive is pinpointing the region-specific frequency band oscillations that are associated with specific parameters of movement during the acceleration and deceleration phases. We report a study using 3D analytic techniques for high density electroencephalography that examines electrocortical dynamics while participants produce upper limb movements to different distances at varying rates. During fast ballistic movements, we observed increased theta band activity in the left motor area contralateral to the moving limb during the acceleration phase of the movement, and theta power correlated with the acceleration of movement. In contrast, beta band activity scaled with the type of movement during the deceleration phase near the end of the movement and correlated with movement time. In the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory area, alpha band activity decreased with the type of movement near the end of the movement, and gamma band activity in visual cortex increased with the type of movement near the end of the movement. Our results suggest that humans use distinct lateralized cortical activity for distance and speed dependent arm movements. We provide new evidence that a temporary increase in theta band power relates to movement acceleration and is important during movement execution. Further, the theta power increase is coupled with desychronization of beta band power and alpha band power which are modulated by the task near the end of movement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-41
Number of pages12
JournalNeuroImage
Volume115
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 5 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Electrophysiology
Upper Extremity
Deceleration
Motor Cortex
Aptitude
Visual Cortex
Electroencephalography
Arm
Extremities
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Beta band dysnchronization
  • ICA
  • Motor cortex
  • MPA
  • Theta band oscillations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

3D Cortical electrophysiology of ballistic upper limb movement in humans. / Ofori, Edward; Coombes, Stephen A.; Vaillancourt, David E.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 115, 05.07.2015, p. 30-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ofori, Edward ; Coombes, Stephen A. ; Vaillancourt, David E. / 3D Cortical electrophysiology of ballistic upper limb movement in humans. In: NeuroImage. 2015 ; Vol. 115. pp. 30-41.
@article{bfc678125e1349228961ec1c723b9e93,
title = "3D Cortical electrophysiology of ballistic upper limb movement in humans",
abstract = "Precise motor control requires the ability to scale the parameters of movement. Theta oscillations across the cortex have been associated with changes in memory, attention, and sensorimotor processing. What has proven more elusive is pinpointing the region-specific frequency band oscillations that are associated with specific parameters of movement during the acceleration and deceleration phases. We report a study using 3D analytic techniques for high density electroencephalography that examines electrocortical dynamics while participants produce upper limb movements to different distances at varying rates. During fast ballistic movements, we observed increased theta band activity in the left motor area contralateral to the moving limb during the acceleration phase of the movement, and theta power correlated with the acceleration of movement. In contrast, beta band activity scaled with the type of movement during the deceleration phase near the end of the movement and correlated with movement time. In the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory area, alpha band activity decreased with the type of movement near the end of the movement, and gamma band activity in visual cortex increased with the type of movement near the end of the movement. Our results suggest that humans use distinct lateralized cortical activity for distance and speed dependent arm movements. We provide new evidence that a temporary increase in theta band power relates to movement acceleration and is important during movement execution. Further, the theta power increase is coupled with desychronization of beta band power and alpha band power which are modulated by the task near the end of movement.",
keywords = "Beta band dysnchronization, ICA, Motor cortex, MPA, Theta band oscillations",
author = "Edward Ofori and Coombes, {Stephen A.} and Vaillancourt, {David E.}",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.04.043",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "115",
pages = "30--41",
journal = "NeuroImage",
issn = "1053-8119",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - 3D Cortical electrophysiology of ballistic upper limb movement in humans

AU - Ofori, Edward

AU - Coombes, Stephen A.

AU - Vaillancourt, David E.

PY - 2015/7/5

Y1 - 2015/7/5

N2 - Precise motor control requires the ability to scale the parameters of movement. Theta oscillations across the cortex have been associated with changes in memory, attention, and sensorimotor processing. What has proven more elusive is pinpointing the region-specific frequency band oscillations that are associated with specific parameters of movement during the acceleration and deceleration phases. We report a study using 3D analytic techniques for high density electroencephalography that examines electrocortical dynamics while participants produce upper limb movements to different distances at varying rates. During fast ballistic movements, we observed increased theta band activity in the left motor area contralateral to the moving limb during the acceleration phase of the movement, and theta power correlated with the acceleration of movement. In contrast, beta band activity scaled with the type of movement during the deceleration phase near the end of the movement and correlated with movement time. In the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory area, alpha band activity decreased with the type of movement near the end of the movement, and gamma band activity in visual cortex increased with the type of movement near the end of the movement. Our results suggest that humans use distinct lateralized cortical activity for distance and speed dependent arm movements. We provide new evidence that a temporary increase in theta band power relates to movement acceleration and is important during movement execution. Further, the theta power increase is coupled with desychronization of beta band power and alpha band power which are modulated by the task near the end of movement.

AB - Precise motor control requires the ability to scale the parameters of movement. Theta oscillations across the cortex have been associated with changes in memory, attention, and sensorimotor processing. What has proven more elusive is pinpointing the region-specific frequency band oscillations that are associated with specific parameters of movement during the acceleration and deceleration phases. We report a study using 3D analytic techniques for high density electroencephalography that examines electrocortical dynamics while participants produce upper limb movements to different distances at varying rates. During fast ballistic movements, we observed increased theta band activity in the left motor area contralateral to the moving limb during the acceleration phase of the movement, and theta power correlated with the acceleration of movement. In contrast, beta band activity scaled with the type of movement during the deceleration phase near the end of the movement and correlated with movement time. In the ipsilateral motor and somatosensory area, alpha band activity decreased with the type of movement near the end of the movement, and gamma band activity in visual cortex increased with the type of movement near the end of the movement. Our results suggest that humans use distinct lateralized cortical activity for distance and speed dependent arm movements. We provide new evidence that a temporary increase in theta band power relates to movement acceleration and is important during movement execution. Further, the theta power increase is coupled with desychronization of beta band power and alpha band power which are modulated by the task near the end of movement.

KW - Beta band dysnchronization

KW - ICA

KW - Motor cortex

KW - MPA

KW - Theta band oscillations

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84929000028&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84929000028&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.04.043

DO - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.04.043

M3 - Article

C2 - 25929620

AN - SCOPUS:84929000028

VL - 115

SP - 30

EP - 41

JO - NeuroImage

JF - NeuroImage

SN - 1053-8119

ER -