2D vs. 3D visual cues for altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Previous research on altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight has focused either on cues provided by 2D features in the visual scene (e.g., splay angle) or on visual cues provided by the presence of 3D objects in the scene (e.g., occlusion). Therefore, little is known about the relative importance of 2D and 3D cues in altitude maintenance. We systematically varied the position variability, height, and pattern of surface elements in a simulated low-level flight environment to vary the salience of 2D and 3D visual cues. For 2D objects, altitude variability increased as a function of object position variability indicating that splay and depression angles are not reliable cues for terrains with irregularly spaced objects. For 3D objects, altitude variability increased less (or not at all) as a function of position variability indicating that the cues provided by 3D objects such as occlusion and motion parallax are the dominant visual cues for altitude maintenance for natural terrains with irregularly spaced objects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages1287-1290
Number of pages4
Volume3
StatePublished - 2007
Event51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007 - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2007Oct 5 2007

Other

Other51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period10/1/0710/5/07

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Gray, R. (2007). 2D vs. 3D visual cues for altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (Vol. 3, pp. 1287-1290)

2D vs. 3D visual cues for altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight. / Gray, Robert.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 3 2007. p. 1287-1290.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gray, R 2007, 2D vs. 3D visual cues for altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. vol. 3, pp. 1287-1290, 51st Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2007, Baltimore, MD, United States, 10/1/07.
Gray R. 2D vs. 3D visual cues for altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 3. 2007. p. 1287-1290
Gray, Robert. / 2D vs. 3D visual cues for altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 3 2007. pp. 1287-1290
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