Supporting MAMI: Mexican-origin Adolescent Mothers and Infants

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Supporting MAMI: Mexican-origin Adolescent Mothers and Infants Supporting MAMI: Mexican-origin Adolescent Mothers and Infants The proposed study focuses on two groups of children who are disproportionately at risk for negative psychological, social, behavioral, and health outcomes: Mexican-origin adolescent mothers and their young children. Adolescent females of Mexican origin have the highest birthrate of all ethnic groups in the U.S., 94.5 births per 1000, which is over twice the overall national rate (National Vital Statistics Report, 2005). The consequences of adolescent pregnancy are far reaching, as adolescent mothers and their children are at increased risk for poor psychosocial health and development (Black et al., 2002; Furstenberg, Brooks-Gunn, & Morgan, 1987; Chandra, Schivello, Ravi, Weinstein, & Hook, 2002). Thus, generative research designed to inform both policy and culturally appropriate preventive intervention strategies to support successful adjustment and parenting for these teenage mothers and for the healthy development of their young children is critical. The current project is a continuation of a 2-year longitudinal study of 206 Mexican-origin adolescent mothers, their mother figures (referred to in our study as the female family member; FFM), and their children that was initially funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (APRP A0060 11-01; Umafia-Taylor, PI). Consistent with the Fahs-Beck Fund's commitment to support research designed to add significantly to knowledge about major social, psychological, behavioral, or public health problems affecting children, families, and communities, the proposed study focuses on understanding the potential protective and risk enhancing processes for Mexican-origin adolescent mothers and their young children. We request funds to partially support Wave 3 of a multiple-informant, multiple-method, quantitative research project designed to examine how stressors associated with adolescent parenthood among Mexican-origin females (i.e., discrimination, economic hardship) contribute to family processes, and in turn, adolescent mothers' psychosocial functioning and their young children's health and development. This will extend our longitudinal study, which involved data gathered from adolescents and FFMs during the adolescents' third trimester of pregnancy (Wave I), and from adolescent mothers, FFMs, and infants when infants were 10 months of age (Wave 2). Specifically, we will collect an additional point of measurement from the 206 families that participated in the original project. In combination with our first two waves of data, the proposed study will capture family and cultural processes that are linked to adolescent mothers' psychosocial adjustment and their young children's cognitive, emotional, and physical development over a three year period. Our focus on how cultural and family processes interact to inform adolescents' psychosocial functioning and adjustment to parenthood and, in turn, their young children's development promises to make significant contributions to the field. This work also will contribute to understanding how to promote positive health and development among a U.S. population that bears a disproportionate burden of disease, injury, death, and disability (CDC, 2004a). The lack of longitudinal data on adolescent mothers and their children and limited attention to developmental processes in ethnic minority populations (Garcia Coli & Magnusson, 1997; McLoyd, 1998) and Latina teen mothers, specifically (Contreras, 2004), means that we know almost nothing about the contexts of development for Mexican-origin adolescent mothers and how they are linked to adolescent mothers' psychosocial functioning and their parenting. The proposed study will examine how economic and cultural stressors contribute to family relationship processes. In tum, processes in the adolescent-FFM relationship are hypothesized to inform adolescents' psychosocial functioning and parenting, and in turn, the development of their young children. Finally,
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date6/8/096/7/11

Funding

  • New York Community Trust: $9,300.00

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