Policing Domestic Violence: A New Approach to an Old Problem

Project: Research project

Description

Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University and Prof. Jill Messing of the ASU School of Social Work, together with the Phoenix Police Department's Family Investigations Bureau (FIB), propose to implement, monitor and evaluate the FIB's efforts to re-train Phoenix police officers in an innovative, evidence-based approach to investigating crimes of domestic violence (DV). This one-year project fits the following VAWA purpose areas: Training law enforcement officers, judges, other court personnel, and prosecutors to more effectively identify and respond to violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence. Developing, training, or expanding units of law enforcement officers, judges, other court personnel, and prosecutors specifically targeting violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault and domestic violence. Developing and implementing more effective police, court, and prosecution policies, protocols, orders, and services specifically devoted to preventing, identifying, and responding to violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault and domestic violence. Supporting formal and informal statewide, multidisciplinary efforts, to the extent not supported by state funds, to coordinate the response of state law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, courts, victim service agencies, and other state agencies and departments to violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, and dating violence. Domestic violence remains a common and corrosive social problem in Phoenix and in Arizona. Phoenix police respond to nearly 50,000 DV-related service calls per year, making DV the department's most common violence-related service call. DV also ranks among the more dangerous service calls for officers. It often occurs in the absence of witnesses appropriate for court-while frequently being witnessed by children who themselves thus become victims. DV cases are uniquely complicated by the typical presence of an intimate, highly interdependent relationship between the offender and the victim-a relationship that often continues despite ongoing abuse, violence and other criminal activity. This relationship often deters victims from pursuing legal remedies.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date8/1/137/31/14

Funding

  • US Department of Justice (DOJ): $82,591.00

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domestic violence
violent crime
assault
offense
law enforcement
violence
police
personnel
legal remedies
social problem
state law
police officer
prosecution
witness
offender
social work
public policy
abuse