Planning Challenges in Human-Robot Teaming: An Integrated Exploration of Representations Algorithms and Human Factors

Project: Research project

Description

Stress can significantly harm ones physiological and psychological well-being. For collegiate student-athletes, the stress that accumulates across their dual roles as a student and an athlete is arguably unavoidable. Fortunately, a significant amount of scholarship has indicated the alleviating effects of social support during stressful times. The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating effects of social support on the stress coping process for student-athletes academic and athletic lives. The stress-buffering model will be used as a framework to explore the ways in which social support is related to student-athletes reports of stress, self-efficacy, and performance. Approximately N = 400 student-athletes will participate in an online survey and report on their perceived levels of stress, social support, self-efficacy, and performance in their academic and athletic lives. It is predicted that stress will negatively influence self-efficacy, social support will moderate the relationship between stress and self-efficacy, and self-efficacy will positively predict performance. Additionally, how academic stress influences athletic performance and how athletic stress influences academic performance will be examined. To test the stress-buffering model, structural equation modeling (SEM), simple linear regressions, and moderating hierarchical regression analyses will be conducted. Important implications for this study include recommendations for the NCAA and athletic departments on how to best support student-athletes during the academic year. Moreover, persons close to student-athletes such as coaches, athletic trainers, teammates, parents, and friends can benefit from a more thorough understanding of how different types of social support benefits student-athletes during stressful times.
StatusActive
Effective start/end date8/1/167/31/19

Funding

  • DOD-NAVY: Office of Naval Research (ONR): $774,376.00

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robot
athlete
planning
social support
self-efficacy
student
performance
regression
dual role
coach
online survey
structural model
coping
parents
well-being
human being