Perceptual training for the management of neurological speech disorders Stephanie Borrie

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Perceptual training for the management of neurological speech disorders Stephanie Borrie Perceptual training for the management of neurological speech disorders Stephanie Borrie Abstract Recent research has established strong empirical evidence of robust intelligibility improvements for young adults familiarised with dysarthric speech (Borrie, McAuliffe, Liss, Kirk,& O'Beirne, in press). Thus, there is preliminary evidence for the development of a novel treatment approach that targets learning on behalf of communication partner/s. The realisation of perceptual training as an appropriate clinical tool for the management of dysarthria necessities that research expand on existing evidence with consideration to the ecological validity of such an approach. Given that dysarthria is most prevalent in the aging population, spouse/caregivers will also be disproportionately elderly. Furthermore, everyday communication interactions frequently involve face-to-face contact and as such, require the integration of auditory speech with visual facial movements. Accordingly, the goal of the proposed project is to investigate performance changes associated with the integration of audiovisual information in elderly listeners familiarised with dysarthric speech. Multivariate analysis of variance will be used to address the effects of age-related decrements in (i) visual acuity, (ii) hearing acuity, and (iii) cognitive capacity, on the outcome of perceptual training across a range of dysarthria severity. Performance changes will be documented with regards to speech intelligibility (percent words correct) and speeded response reaction time (sentence verification task). In addition, measures indicative of segmental (percent syllable resemblance) and suprasegmental (lexical boundary errors) processing will be used to examine the cognitive-perceptual mechanisms that underpin learning. The results of this study are fundamental to establish the validity of a treatment paradigm that exploits perceptual learning for improved quality of life in those debilitated by neurological speech disorders.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date3/15/123/14/14

Funding

  • Neurological Foundation of New Zealand: $100,137.00

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