Parallel In Situ Screening of Remediation Strategies for Improved Decision Making, Remedial Design, and Cost Savings

Project: Research project

Description

Problem Statement: Swift and cost-effective remediation of contaminated subsurface environments is an important but challenging goal. It is widely acknowledged that remediation strategies have to be tailored to individual sites based on their unique hydrogeological and biological conditions, as well as the types and concentrations of pollutants present (National Research Council, 2000). Yet, no adequate technology is currently available to screen multiple candidate remediation technologies in situ at the same time in the same place for an unbiased comparison of their effectiveness and a scientifically sound determination of the most appropriate cleanup technique. In addition, no tools exist at this time, that allow one to optimize the remedial design of a selected remediation strategy in in situ tests to determine the optimal dosage of nutrients, catalysts and/or microorganisms chosen for injection into the subsurface. Also lacking are technology-screening tools that provide in situ information without changing the local geochemistry and microbiology as a result of the tests conducted. In other words, technologies are lacking that provide the convenience of remediation strategy comparison without impacting in any way the integrity of groundwater monitoring wells used for testing. The present proposal seeks to provide a field demonstration of an innovative approach, the in situ microcosm array (ISMA) technology, that addresses the above needs. The technology promises to bring better decision making, remedial design and substantial cost savings to the DoD and the field of environmental restoration as a whole.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date5/20/092/28/13

Funding

  • DOD-ARMY: Army Corps of Engineers (USACE): $1,155,125.00

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savings
remediation
decision making
cost
environmental restoration
in situ test
microbiology
cleanup
microcosm
screening
in situ
microorganism
geochemistry
catalyst
well
groundwater
pollutant
nutrient
monitoring
comparison