Master Agreement: Advanced Electromagnetic Methods for Aerospace Vehicles

Project: Research project

Description

Abstract (revised) The purpose of this research program is to develop, advance and test high and low frequency (HF, VHF, UHF, Microwave) methods, and associated computer codes, to analyze various radiating elements located on complex structures with combinations of conducting, engineered high impedance surfaces (HIS,) nonconducting, energy absorbing surfaces, and interfaces. Current methods of analysis require limitations on the geometrical shapes used to model the structure and on the surface conductivity of the outer skin. In addition to being computationally inefficient, most existing vehicle antenna simulation codes allow surface impedance to be modeled as perfectly conducting only. While this may be sufficient for many configurations, it will not adequately model future airframe design which incorporate advanced composite materials and engineered high impedance surfaces. The performance of on-board systems can be significantly affected by the electromagnetic characteristics of these materials, and the type of surfaces they are mounted on. If the analysis tools to accurately predict the radiation characteristics of antennas located on these advanced material airframes, such as helicopters, were available, antennas, skin materials, and surfaces (such as high impedance surfaces; HIS) could be synergistically designed, integrated and located to actually enhance performance. However, at present, the analytical and simulation tools necessary to take advantage of such designs need to be advanced, tested and validated against each other to see which ones are more appropriate for complex airframes, such as helicopter structures. To validate the developed technology and associated software, various radiation elements and structure geometries will be fabricated and tested in ASUs ElectroMagnetic Anechoic Chamber (EMAC). The measured data will be compared with predictions based on the developed and advanced methods and associated computer codes. The proposed research will focus to develop fundamental concepts, techniques, algorithms and software that will remove some of the present limitations in predicting the radiation characteristics of antennas on complex aerospace vehicles, such as helicopters. More importantly, the research will concentrate on the following Statement of Work (SOW).

Description

The purpose of this research program is to develop high and low frequency (HF, VHF, UHF, Microwave) methods, and associated computer codes, to analyze various radiating elements located on complex structures with combinations of conducting, nonconducting, and energy absorbing surfaces and interfaces. Current methods of analysis require limitations on the geometrical shapes used to model the structure and on the surface conductivity of the outer skin. In addition to being computationally inefficient, most existing vehicle antenna simulation codes allow surface impedance to be modeled as perfectly conducting only. While this may be sufficient for many configurations, it will not adequately model future airframe design which incorporate advanced composite materials. The performance of on-board systems can be significantly affected by the electromagnetic characteristics of these materials. If the analysis tools to accurately predict the radiation characteristics of antennas located on these advanced material airframes, such as helicopters, were available, antennas and skin materials could be synergistically designed and located to actually enhance performance. However, at present, the analytical and simulation tools necessary to take advantage of such designs are not available. To validate the developed technology, various radiation elements and structure geometries will be fabricated and tested in ASUs ElectroMagnetic Anechoic Chamber (EMAC). The measured data will be compared with predictions based on the developed methods and associated computer codes. The proposed research will focus to develop fundamental concepts, techniques, and algorithms that will remove some of the present limitations in predicting the radiation characteristics of antennas on complex aerospace vehicles, such as helicopters. More importantly, the research will concentrate on the following Statement of Work (SOW).
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date8/14/129/28/17

Funding

  • DOD-ARMY-RDECOM: Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD): $600,000.00

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Aerospace vehicles
Airframes
Antennas
Helicopters
Radiation
Skin
Anechoic chambers
Microwaves
Geometry
Composite materials