Honduras Justice Human Rights and Security Strengthening (JHRSS)

Project: Research project

Description

This Exhibit A to the Teaming Agreement (TA) sets out the anticipated role and Scope of Work (SOW) of Arizona State University (ASU) as a Teaming Partner to DAI under the Justice, Human Rights and Security Activity (JHRS), as currently contemplated by the parties.

ASUs primary responsibilities will leverage its existing work in the Caribbean and Central America, through the Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety (CVPCS), to create a more effective and accountable justice and security sector, reducing violence in target areas. This will build on its previous efforts in responding to gangs and violence, as well as strengthening police institutions, especially with regard to community policing. ASU will provide support in the development of evidence-based models that enhance relations between citizens and law enforcement, as well as the wider justice sector, in addition to providing enhancing overall information management and sharing across the project.

In particular its support will be constructed around the following results:

Sub-Result 1.2. Accurate and timely information related to crime and violence is collected, shared and utilized in the five target municipalities.

Arizona State University will provide short-term technical assistance (STTA) to help develop and enhance information management systems used by local actors such as observatories, civil society organizations (CSOs) and justice sector agencies, as well as support the overall training of these groups in their application. Specifically, ASU will identify models of analysis, for sharing and publication of data collected in order to enhance the credibility of place-based or hot spot interventions implemented by the government of Honduras, CSOs and with the support of USAID, INL and other donors.

Sub-result 3.1. Improved performance, efficiency and accountability of community police

ASU will also contribute STTA to improving community policing operations, standards and overall performance in a way that harmonizes with other place-based interventions or overall operations across the justice sector. This will include work on service delivery through community police and in tandem with centros integrados, investigative units, civil society and other organizations. ASU will provide special emphasis on assisting police with more effective planning and allocation of resources across the organization, rather than approaches that focus solely on specific activities or targets.

In accordance with USAID direction and approval, DAI intends to allocate sufficient funds, including grants, to achieve all USAID required results. All activities will be linked to indicators prescribed in the RFTOP. DAI will make every effort to allow Arizona State University to review and comment on any indicators, data sources and measurement methods related to its scope of work prior to finalizing and submitting the JHRS Monitoring and Evaluation Plan to USAID for approval. Arizona State University will also support DAIs commitment to rigorous monitoring and learning by providing recommendations to DAIs monitoring and evaluation (M&E) team on how to scale and replicate activities that ASU has implemented, and sharing information on the successes and challenges faced by ASU in supporting local counterparts.

In addition to its primary responsibilities and contributions to the JHRS monitoring and evaluation system to inform evidence-based approaches, Arizona State University will ensure the integration of cross-cutting themes in all of its activities, including: (i) gender equality and gender-based violence; (ii) work with other USAID, USG and donor coordination, as well as public-private partnerships; and (iii) incorporation of Learning and Adaptation across the length of the intervention.
StatusActive
Effective start/end date1/24/1710/13/20

Funding

  • US Agency for International Development (USAID): $636,456.00

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Honduras
human security
human rights
justice
violence
monitoring
civil society
police
technical assistance
community
information management
responsibility
evaluation
security sector
measurement method
Central America
gender
public private partnership
law enforcement
credibility