Developing Novel Auxiliary Technologies for Crisis Tracking

Project: Research project

Description

Project Summary The Data Mining and Machine Learning Lab at ASU has been spearheading the effort to build social media tools for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HADR). We have made tangible progress by developing software systems such as ACT1, BlogTrackers2, and TweetTracker3. These systems help first responders, relief organizers, and researchers to collect, curate, and store data, as well as analyze and visualize data. As McNutt and Leshner pointed out in their August 9, 2013 Science Editorial: Disasters are inevitable and can strike anywhere at any time. Whether it is a natural event (such as a hurricane, flood, or earthquake), disease pandemic, or a purposeful or accidental human action (such as an act of terrorism or fire), the consequences can be wideranging and devastating. Some key elements for prompt HADR are situational awareness, reliable information gathering, information integration, and effective coordination among various organizations. With preliminary successes in deploying these software systems for blog and tweet tracking and information gathering, this proposal aims to expand successes and build new auxiliary technologies of social computing for crisis tracking in a variety of means. In this project, we propose to study research and innovation issues, and develop new social computing theories and algorithms. Furthermore, we propose to apply them to real-world problems of crisis tracking in the context of social media. In particular, we propose to build novel auxiliary technologies while investigating fundamental research issues of social computing: (1) VideoTracker, (2) InstaTracker, (3) CrisisTracker, and (4) CrowdTracker. The new challenges arise due to changes of media, different platforms, and users of different needs.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date11/1/132/29/16

Funding

  • DOD-NAVY: Office of Naval Research (ONR): $750,000.00

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Disasters
Terrorism
Blogs
Hurricanes
Data mining
Learning systems
Earthquakes
Fires
Innovation