Coxiella symbiont function in Rhipicephalus sanguineus: Proteomic approach

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Coxiella symbiont function in Rhipicephalus sanguineus: Proteomic approach Coxiella symbiont function in Rhipicephalus sanguineus: Proteomic approach. Abstract: Title: Coxiella symbiont function in Rhipicephalus sanguineus: Proteomic approach. Application number: 2013380 PIs: Yuval Gottlieb, Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Timothy L. Karr, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University. It has long been documented that the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus harbors a symbiotic bacteria in its Malphigian tubules (Mt) and ovaries. Recently we discovered that this bacterium belonging to the genus Coxiella, is prevalent in all tick tested and is transovarially transmitted. These findings suggest an obligatory association between the tick and Coxiella. Obligatory symbionts often provide specific functions and nutrients to their hosts. In the case of blood feeding ticks which are obligatory blood feeding arthropods, symbionts are thought to supplement the host diet with metabolites missing in blood such as B vitamins. Our central hypothesis is that Coxiella express specific genes related to the production of B vitamins in the hosted tick during starvation and engorgement. Likewise, we suggest that host cells infected with Coxiella present an excellent model system for the identification of genes involved in symbiosis maintenance. In order to elucidate Coxiella genes and gene products essential for tick survival we propose to use mass spectrometry based proteomics to (i) identify and compare expressed proteins of Coxiella in starved and fed tick ovaries and Malpighian tubules, (ii) identify expressed protein of Coxiella in tick cell culture and (iii) follow and quantify specific identified proteins in the tick body. The finding of specific expressed proteins and their localization in the tick are highly relevant for understanding the obligatory symbiont-host interaction. They can be later used in future strategies to interrupt this association for reduction of tick burden for the benefit of human and animals health.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/1/1512/31/18

Funding

  • United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation: $62,571.00

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